Intellectual Autobiographies – Tracing Someone’s Belief System

I’d love to see a book that is full of first-person essays by folks who discuss how their worldview has evolved over their lifetime.

Here’s an example: Bryan Kaplan’s intellectual autobiography. It starts, predictably, with Ayn Rand, and then meanders from there. It’s interesting to study the maturity of somebody’s beliefs.

The intellectual autobiographies needn’t just trace philosophy or economic beliefs. I’d be interested in what fundamental life assumptions have changed for your basic successful CEO. "What I used to believe" followed by "What I now believe" headers.

Of course this book idea is premised on a hope that people’s worldviews do change over their lifetime — and in some circles, like successful executives or academics, I think this happens because it’s part of what makes them successful.

The best thing that can come out of a book like this — if it illustrates what I expect it would which is that the process of belief-formation is long and ever-continuous — is the message that it’s OK to change your mind.

Anyone want to get started? Leave a comment with "What I used to believe" followed by "What I now believe".

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